Starting Up a Massage Therapy School in Wyoming

In Wyoming state, the practice of massage therapy is currently not regulated.  If you want to start a new massage therapy school Wyoming, you will have to get a license from the Wyoming Department of Education.

A Private Non-Degree Grants A Post-secondary School Licensure

In order to obtain a private school license, you will have to apply using an online application form on the Department of Education website.  There is a checklist of items you will need to have in order to complete the application. You need to make sure that you have completed all that is listed on the checklist before you start the application. You also need to complete the online form in one session.

The materials you need to provide includes:

  • A $10,000 original performance bond or you can also provide a final letter of credit;
  • A $200 license fee;
  • A $100 fee for a registered agent;
  • A list of names of all administrators and staff;
  • An attendance record form or book;
  • An copy of your enrollment contract including your tuition, fees, and refund policy;
  • An academic discipline policy;
  • A copy of a description of instructional methods and outlines;
  • A course outlines for each course;
  • A copy of a current financial statement;
  • A copy of a mission statement;
  • A proof of compliance with the city, the county and the state regulations;
  • A copy of a graduation certificate.

The state regulations requires that your school should meet the minimum standards:

  • You must only teach the approved programs.
  • You must have the enough space; an equipment; an instructional materials; and an instructional personnel.
  • The administrative as well as the instructional staff must be qualified to teach and manage your program.
  • You have to provide the state with the information listed on the checklist.
  • You must give an award; a certificate; or a diploma to students who have completed your program.
  • A maintain adequate records on attendance; the progress; or the grades.
  • You have to enforce the satisfactory standards with relates to the attendance, the progress and the conduct.
  • Must comply with the city, the county, the state and the federal regulations.
  • You do not discriminate on the basis of the race, the creed, the color, the sex, or the national origin.
  • You do not use the misleading advertisements.
  • Your administrators and personnel should have not been convicted of fraud; moral turpitude or other crime. They should not engaged in any behaviors that lead to revocation of a school license.
  • You should have a refund policy that comply with the rules of the US Department of Education refund policy.

You should renew your license yearly.

Summary

The state of Wyoming does not regulate the practice of massage therapy.  Massage schools must be licensed just like the private schools by the state. The cost of licensure is $200 per year.  An agent must also be licensed if he or she recruits for the school.  You will required to have a performance bond or irrevocable letter of credit in an amount of $10,000.

Links

Wyoming Department of Education Private School Licensing

Posted in Massage Therapy Schools

Starting a Massage School in Arkansas

In Arkansas, the requirements for massage therapy practice and education are overseen by the Arkansas Department of Health.  In order for you to start a massage therapy school in Arkansas, you must obtain a certificate of  massage therapy school licensure from the Department of Health.

Obtaining School Licensure in Arkansas

In order for you to obtain a school license in Arkansas, you must first submit an application to the Department of Health, either as a “School of Massage Therapy” or a “Postsecondary School of Massage Therapy.”  A Postsecondary School will only provide instruction to high school graduates, while a School of Massage will provide instruction to secondary school (high school) students.  If you want to provide instruction to both secondary and post-secondary students you must obtain both licenses.

Massage Therapy Laws, Rules and Regulations

You must show that your school meets all the requirements in the Massage Therapy Law.  The Arkansas Law requires you to:

  • Pass an inspection of the facility by the Department of Health. The rules and regulations require schools facilities to provide an atmosphere that is conducive to learning.  You must have adequate space around the massage tables, adequate lighting, temperature control and ventilation, educational equipment such as chalk boards, charts and teaching aids should be visible.  In addition, the school must be maintained in a “clean and operable condition.”
  • Your school is required to have adequate work space for the number of students you will teach.  You must have a minimum of one massage table for every three students in a class.  You must have a minimum of one hand washing station with hot and cold water, soap and a sanitary hand drying method.  The hand washing station must be easily accessible.  Alcohol and “illicit drug use” are specifically prohibited from massage school property. You must also have a way to store student records off-site.
  • The curriculum for the school must include at least 500 hours of in-class instruction, over a term of 4 months or longer. Those 500 hours must be distributed in the following manner:
    1. 175 hours of anatomy, physiology, pathology and contraindications to massage therapy
    2. 225 hour of massage technique
    3. 25 hours of hydrotherapy, heliotherapy, and electrotherapy
    4. 25 hours of hygiene and infection control
    5. 25 hours of massage therapy law, business management, and professional ethics
    6. 25 hours of related subjects, as approved by the Department of Health.
  • Each course must have a syllabus that outlines learning objectives, have daily lesson plans and be taught by a qualified instructor.
  • There can be no less than 50 active minutes of teaching per credit hour. Active teaching includes lectures, activities, demonstrations, and supervised hands-on practice.
  • You must have both written and practical evaluations for your students, and the grades must be recorded and made accessible to the Department of Health on request.
  • You must record attendance and keep records that the Department of Health can review on request.
  • You must keep records of first time pass/fail of licensing examinations. Any school with fewer than 75% of the students passing the exam may be subject to probation, suspension or revocation of license.
  • You must provide students with information on how to access their school records.
  • You must include a minimum of three hours of HIV/AIDS and other communicable disease education in your 25 hours of hygiene and infection control.
  • You must require and provide proof of CPR education for all students at the time of their graduation.
  • If you teach massage on students who are wearing swimsuits or underwear, you must provide at least 20 hours of hands-on practice with unclothed subjects. The exception would be if your student has a documented religious or medical reason.
  • No more than 5% of your hours can be dedicated to energy modalities such as Reiki and Polarity Therapy.

You must also be able to prove that your instructors are qualified to teach their courses.  You must have on file documentation as to their training, such as resumes, transcripts, diplomas, and certificates.  Instructors who are to teach massage techniques and other hands-on topics must have a license as a master massage therapist or a massage therapy instructor, and must have a minimum of two consecutive years of active experience in the practice of massage therapy.

Instructors who teach academic subjects, such as anatomy and physiology, must have a master massage therapist license, a  massage therapy instructor license or a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree plus two years practical experience in a field directly related to what they will be teaching.    Instructors for non-technical topics such as ethics and business management must have a master massage therapist license, a massage therapy instructor license or a minimum of an Associate’s degree plus two years practical experience in a field directly related to what they will be teaching.

You may have guest instructors teach up to 25 hours of your curriculum without them being pre-approved by the board.  No guest instructor may teach more than 16 hours of the curriculum.  You must keep a log of guest instructors and must ascertain that they are qualified to teach the subjects, based on the previous requirements.

In addition to approval from the Department of Health, you may need to obtain additional approvals per local ordinances.   You must have ready for inspection by the Department of Health any fire code inspections, occupancy license and/or business licenses and permits as required by local law.

Application Process

Your Arkansas massage therapy school application requires you to provide the following information to the Department of Health:

  1. Proposed school information, including address, phone numbers and proposed hours of business.
  2. Owner information: name, address, phone number, date of birth.
  3. Information on owner’s massage therapy education, current license, previous licenses, other secondary and post-secondary education, 10 years employment history, and residency.
  4. Four letters of recommendation.
  5. Statement of why you are qualified to own a massage school and/or teach in one.
  6. Description of your school location and facilities, along with a photograph.
  7. Equipment available and what you propose to use for instruction.
  8. Complete curriculum, including what textbooks you plan to use.
  9. A list of employees and/or staff and their qualifications.
  10. All forms you will use to maintain records for students.
  11. All tests you will give.
  12. A copy of your school catalog.
  13. Information on whether you have a physician on call.
  14. Your refund policy.
  15. The date when you will be prepared for inspection.
  16. A statement of your personal and criminal background.

The application must be notarized and accompanied by the application fee of $850.

Arkansas also requires a criminal background check when you submit a new application.

All information must be received by the Department of Health 30 days before a scheduled meeting, and any additional information requested by the department must be sent within 90 days.  The application will be “investigated thoroughly” before a license is granted.

Summary

If you want to start a massage school in Arkansas, you must obtain a massage school license from the Arkansas Department of Health.  The process to obtain the license includes ensuring that your facility, curriculum, staff, and policies comply with all the laws, rules and regulations of the Department of Health.  You must also ensure that your massage school complies with local laws for businesses.  After you have submitted an application and the application fee, the Department of Health will review the application and inspect the facility.

Links

Arkansas Department of Health, Massage Therapy Page

Arkansas Rules and Regulations

Arkansas Massage Law

School Application

Postsecondary School Application

Posted in Massage Therapy Schools

Karen Meece – How Massage Therapy Found Me & Changed My Life

 Karen MeeceI love a good story, and that seems to sum up my life so far, lots of twists and turns along the way and certainly not what I planned.  I was born and raised in England and my ambition in life was to be a wife and mom.

I pursued a career in administration which afforded me the opportunity to fulfill another passion of mine to travel. I was 23 when I met my husband, Chris.  He was a groomsman for his brother and I was a bridesmaid for my childhood friend, we met at a wedding rehearsal in England.  My friend said we’d either love each other or hate each other.  Turned out he would be the love of my life.  We got married two years after meeting and started our lives together in the USA.

Prior to us meeting, Chris served for four years in the Marine Corps and expressed his desire to serve again early in our marriage so this time around he joined the Army.  We started our family the same year he enlisted, I was quite happy, his career afforded me the ability to stay at home with the kids.  We were blessed with two little girls and stationed in Germany.  Little did we know we unwittingly signed up for the “plan two children get one free” program and just before my husband left on a fifteen-month deployment in 2007, we found out our son would be joining us.

Now this is the part where the profound impact event enters my story.  Three months into Chris’ second deployment my phone rang early one morning.  It was my husband’s commander informing me Chris had fallen 10 feet from the top of his helicopter while doing his pre-flight inspection.  The next four days were a rollercoaster as we awaited his arrival from Iraq, accurate updates were not forthcoming and I was unsure as to what state my husband would be in when he returned.

Chris broke his pelvis in a few places, shattered his wrist, tore his shoulder up, broke some teeth and nearly bit his lip off!  On his return there were surgeries, physical therapy assessments and we were launched into a new world of recovery.  After eighteen months of intense physical therapy, Chris made a remarkable comeback….. or so I thought.

Turns out you don’t recover from those injuries, you find a way to manage them and you find a constant companion called chronic pain.  I have found myself helpless over these years seeing his gait and mobility decline and his pain levels increase.

I had a lightbulb moment in June, “hey Love, how about we invest in me and send me to school so I can help compliment the therapies you will need in the future”.  And this is what completely sums my husband up, “sure” was the answer with zero hesitation.  He has afforded me a wonderful life, I have been able to stay home with the kids which was what I wanted to do, I have been able to homeschool them for the past few years due to the transient nature of the military and here I was asking if we could spend a lot of money on school.  Three weeks later I was sitting in my class.

I have always enjoyed massage, I have experienced the benefits personally for relaxation purposes, however my knowledge was extremely limited prior to entering school.  The accident changed me.  I credit Chris’ physical therapists to saving his life in many ways, they were vital in getting Humpty back together again!  To this day they remain our friends.

One of the therapists nicknamed him “Nemo” as he couldn’t swim straight in the therapy pool.  Chris informed her that he just had a lucky fin like the movie character.  Turns out it helps to have a sense of humor when you are in therapy.  He got his revenge by setting all of the timers in the physical therapy clinic to go off at the same time.  It didn’t take them long to work out who the culprit was.

During those eighteen months I saw the positive impact of physical therapy and I knew that it would marry well with massage therapy.  It just took me ten years to realize that part of the answer was looking at me in the mirror.

So that is a little about me and how massage therapy found me.  I am now three months from graduating and early on in the course there was another turn in the road.  I realized I am passionate about massage therapy.  I really had no idea about the depth of understanding and the world I was about to enter.

My plan was honestly just to help my husband and this will still be my goal first and foremost, however I would like to explore this profession more.  I love the therapeutic side of massage therapy.  What has changed me for the worse?  That is a hard question to answer, I think if anything I have to constantly remind myself this is lifetime of learning and I am not going to just “get it”, instead I am going to “grow it”.  I must say overall, this has been an extremely positive experience.

I love massage therapy and its ability to help people. The AMTA 2016 Consumer Survey showed that consumers are turning to massage therapy to assist with medical conditions.  “78 percent of individuals surveyed claim their primary reason for receiving a massage in the previous 12 months was medical (50 percent) or stress (28 percent) related, according to the 20th annual consumer survey sponsored by the American Massage Therapy Association.”

I have found this to be true when I am in clinic at school.  I am often elated by the end of a school night, especially when I have been building a working relationship with some clients and seeing the positive changes massage is making in them.  I am also happy to report that Chris has benefited from what I am learning at school and we have been able to see a reduction in his pain.

I don’t think I could appreciate the positive changes massage therapy would gift me before the accident happened and I don’t know if I would have viewed massage therapy other than a birthday treat to pamper myself.  Often an event has to happen in order for us to see things in a different light.

Massage therapy has changed me in a way I didn’t plan, yet I am grateful for it finding me.  Maya Angelou once said, “when you know better, you do better” and that statement has always held true for me.

So where will my story take me next?  I really don’t know but as long as I have this guy by my side, I can assure you it will be an adventure.

I am a military spouse, homeschool mama to three wonderful children and following a newfound passion in massage therapy.  I am attending the Massage Therapy Program at Bellus Academy in Manhattan, Kansas. I am also an expert plate spinner, multiple deployment survivor, cereal for dinner some nights specialist.  But first and foremost a British born girl who followed her heart, said “I do”, and went for the ride of her life with a guy from Illinois.     

 

Posted in Aspiring Massage Students

How to Begin a Massage School in Connecticut

In Connecticut, the requirements for massage therapy practice and education are overseen by the Connecticut Department of Health.  If your school is located in Connecticut, your graduates will be eligible for licensure in Connecticut only if the school provides a minimum of 500 hours of instruction and has a school code in good standing with the NCBMTB.

In addition, you must have your school accredited by an agency approved by the US Department of Education, a state board of post-secondary technical trade and business schools, or by the Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA).

Since most accreditation agencies require the school to be in operation for at least two years, it is most probable that you would need to be approved by the state board of post-secondary technical trade and business schools, in addition to having an NCBMTB school code.  In Connecticut, you would have to get a Post-secondary Career School Authorization from the Office of Higher Education.

Connecticut Post-secondary Career School Authorization

You need to begin the authorization application process 120 or more before you plan to open your school.  For the application, you need to provide a financial statement/forecast; a $40,000 irrevocable letter of credit issued by a Connecticut bank; a non-refundable $2,000 application fee; and the information required on the application form, as well as any other information requested.

The application, a 59-page document, requires to you provide information such as school owners; business type (proprietorship, corporation, etc.); any additional facilities beyond the main campus; and a certificate of insurance that includes liability, property damage, and worker’s compensation if applicable.  In addition, you must provide a fire marshal inspection and zoning officer approval.

Each owner and school director must send in a Disclosure of Criminal Record form and a Revocation History that reveals any school certificate that has been revoked or privilege to operate a school has been canceled in Connecticut or any other state.  You must submit a campus roster, listing every employee that has contact with the students.  The school director must provide information regarding his or her qualifications, education and experience.  You must provide a form indicating that the campus director’s qualifications meet state code.

You must provide a form for each instructor that provides information on their qualifications and experience.  You must also provide a form for each person who will be a recruiter for the school indicating that they are familiar with the school’s curriculum and mission and will not misrepresent the school when recruiting.

In addition to information on the school’s facilities and employees, you will need to provide information on the programs and courses you plan to offer, including the length of the program and tuition to be charged, days your classes will meet, and a breakdown of how the time will be spent (lecture, labs, clinicals, etc.). You will be asked to list all library materials available to students, including the copyright dates and editors.  In addition, you will have to attach

  • All the student forms to be used at the school, such as applications, enrollment contracts, attendance forms, and transcript forms.
  • A copy of your catalog and show that it meets Connecticut’s requirements.
  • A list of fees, if any, that your school will charge for services to third parties, such as charging for massage services from an employee or a student.
  • Proposed advertisements for your school.
  • An affidavit of non-discrimination.
  • An affidavit of requirements for school closure.
  • A designation of an agent of service and a keeper of records.
  • Information on how you will maintain student records.

Following receipt of the documents, representatives of the Office of Higher Education will conduct an on-site evaluation of your facility, and submit their findings and recommendations.  Once you have corrected any deficiencies they found, a letter of authorization will be provided.  You will then have to apply for renewal of your author every year for the next 3 years, after which longer renewal periods may apply.

National Certification Board for Massage Therapy and Bodywork (NCBMTB)

The NCBMTB will provide a school code to massage therapy schools that meet its minimum requirements for massage schools.  This includes a 500-hour or more curriculum with at least 125 hours of anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology; 200 hours of in-class, supervised instruction in assessment, theory, and application; 40 hours of pathology; 10 hours of business and ethics (at least 6 must be in ethics; and 125 hours in related subjects that will complete your massage therapy education.

Assuming you are a new school and have not become accredited, you will be required to provide information in addition to the application.  This includes proof of your business license, proof of school ownership, a list of your instructors with their resumes and qualifications, a copy of the credentials for the licensed massage therapists working at your school, your school’s attendance policy, your school’s course description and catalog, your syllabus outline for each course, a copy a sample transcript, and a breakdown of your instruction hours.

NCBMTB school codes are needed for your graduates to be able to obtain certification from NCBMTB.  There is no cost to the school for obtaining a code.  You will have to renew your school’s code every 2-5 years.

Summary

To open a new massage therapy school in the State of Connecticut, you need to have authorization to operate from the Connecticut Office of Higher Education.  In addition, your curriculum must meet the standards of NCBMTB and you must have a school code from NCBMTB in order for your graduates to be eligible for licensure in the state.

Your application for authorization should be submitted a minimum of 120 days before you plan to open your school, and will require a significant amount of information regarding your school’s facilities, employees, and curriculum. You will also have to obtain insurance for the school as well as have a $40,000 irrevocable letter of credit from a Connecticut bank.  The application itself costs about $2,000.  Your authorization must be renewed annually for the first three years, after which renewals may be longer (up to 5 years).

Links

http://www.ctohe.org/POSA/Schools.shtml

http://www.ctohe.org/POSA/App/CompleteApplication.pdf

NCBTMB School Information

Posted in Massage Therapy Schools

Colorado Massage School Start Up Requirements

In Colorado, the requirements for massage therapy practice and education are overseen by the Colorado Office of Massage Therapy Licensure, which is a division of the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies.  If your school is located in Colorado, your graduates will be eligible for licensure in Colorado only if the school provides a minimum of 500 hours of instruction and is approved by the Division of Private and Occupational Schools, certified by the Colorado Community College System, or accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency for massage therapy programs.

If you are starting a new private massage therapy program, you most likely will need to get approval from the Division of Private and Occupational Schools, since national accreditation is generally not granted until after the school has been in operation for several years.  You may also be considered an approved school if you have a school code in good standing with the NCBMTB.

Colorado Division of Private and Occupational Schools

To obtain approval from the Division of Private and Occupational Schools, you must file an application  for a Certificate of Approval to Operate a Colorado Private Occupational School.  Colorado law requires that any school not exempted must obtain a Certificate of Approval.

Examples of exempted schools include public schools, parochial schools, schools that are strictly avocational, four-year universities that grant degrees, private elementary and secondary schools that are providing basic education, schools that are free to the student, training provided by an employer for its employees, and nurse aide training, flight instruction, and yoga schools.  Few massage schools would fall under these exemptions, so a private massage therapy training program would likely be required to have this approval.

The application for the certificate of approval requires you to provide school information such as name, address, website, telephone numbers and essential personnel.  In addition, you must indicate the type of business, whether your school is a franchise, and whether you have more than one campus.  Second, you must indicate who would be considered an agent for your school (a person who will be in the business of selling your services), and each agent must submit an agent permit application and the required fee (about $300 per agent).

You must provide a surety bond or alternative in an amount not less than $5,000, based on your anticipated tuition and fees.  You must provide background information on the owners and officers of the school including previous schools owned or operated, previous bankruptcy, felony convictions or charges pending, misdemeanor convictions or charges pending, professional misconduct, license denial or revocation, and any professional disciplinary actions.

You must also provide the name of your financial institution, information on financial aid you accept, your tuition range, and accreditation information, if you are accredited.  You must send in a Program and/or Stand-alone Course Approval Application.  For a new school, the fee for this is included in your application fee (which is about $5000).  Finally, you must attach documents to support the information you gave on the application form.

Once all materials have been received, the Division will review it and make a decision on whether to approve your school.  The Division advises to allow at least 60 days for review, revisions and a site visit before approval can be given.  Once the school has been approved, you will need to provide periodic reports to the Division.  The approval expires after three years and must be renewed to continue operating in Colorado.

National Certification Board for Massage Therapy and Bodywork (NCBMTB)

The NCBMTB will provide a school code to massage therapy schools that meet its minimum requirements for massage schools.  This includes a 500-hour or more curriculum with at least 125 hours of anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology; 200 hours of in-class, supervised instruction in assessment, theory, and application; 40 hours of pathology; 10 hours of business and ethics (at least 6 must be in ethics; and 125 hours in related subjects that will complete your massage therapy education.

Assuming you are a new school and have not become accredited, you will be required to provide information in addition to the application.  This includes proof of your business license, proof of school ownership, a list of your instructors with their resumes and qualifications, a copy of the credentials for the licensed massage therapists working at your school, your school’s attendance policy, your school’s course description and catalog, your syllabus outline for each course, a copy a sample transcript, and a breakdown of your instruction hours.

NCBMTB school codes are needed for your graduates to be able to obtain certification from NCBMTB.  There is no cost to the school for obtaining a code.  You will have to renew your school’s code every 2-5 years.

Summary

To open a private massage therapy school in Colorado, you will have to provide a minimum of 500 hours of instruction and, in most cases, obtain approval from the Colorado Division of Private and Occupational Schools.  Obtaining an approved school code from NCBMTB provides proof that your program meets the educational requirements of the state of Colorado.

The cost to obtain approval from the state is about $5000, in addition to agent fees and surety bond requirements.  The Division advises to allow at least 60 days for review, revisions and a site visit before approval can be given.

Links

Colorado Massage Therapy Regulations

Colorado Office of Massage Therapy Licensure

NCBTMB School Information

Colorado Division of Private and Occupational Schools

http://highered.colorado.gov/DPOS/Schools/forms.html

http://highered.colorado.gov/DPOS/Schools/faq.html

http://highered.colorado.gov/DPOS/Schools/Forms/newschoolFAQs2015_3.pdf

Posted in Massage Therapy Schools
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